Dermoscopy
Dermoscopy

Skin cancer incidence continues to rise. It is estimated that half of the worldwide melanoma deaths occur in European countries. Dermoscopy,  has evidence-confirmed benefits for increasing the accuracy of skin cancer diagnosis. Dermoscopy utilizes simple epiluminescence magnifiers and relies on subjective and qualitative visual inspections. Establishing widely acceptable Dermoscopy patterns for skin diseases is far from being realised and therefore diagnostic performance depends heavily on the examiners’ skills and experience.

Digital Dermoscopy offers important tools towards establishing widely acceptable patterns. They, however, still rely on tri-color imaging patterns that are often non specific enough to reveal pathologies.

Skin cancer incidence continues to rise. It is estimated that half of the worldwide melanoma deaths occur in European countries. Dermoscopy,  has evidence-confirmed benefits for increasing the accuracy of skin cancer diagnosis. Dermoscopy utilizes simple epiluminescence magnifiers and relies on subjective and qualitative visual inspections. Establishing widely acceptable Dermoscopy patterns for skin diseases is far from being realised and therefore diagnostic performance depends heavily on the examiners’ skills and experience.

Digital Dermoscopy offers important tools towards establishing widely acceptable patterns. They, however, still rely on tri-color imaging patterns that are often non specific enough to reveal pathologies.

After several years of pioneering research in skin biophotonics and spectral imaging,  QCELL succeeded to add several new dimensions of information to Dermoscopy, allowing for subsurface visualization and for identifying skin lesions on the basis of their spectral pattern. Spectral View is today’s most advanced digital Dermoscope. Live spectral imaging meets artificial intelligence, bringing Dermoscopy to the 21st century.

After several years of pioneering research in skin biophotonics and spectral imaging,  QCELL succeeded to add several new dimensions of information to Dermoscopy, allowing for subsurface visualization and for identifying skin lesions on the basis of their spectral pattern. Spectral View is today’s most advanced digital Dermoscope. Live spectral imaging meets artificial intelligence, bringing Dermoscopy to the 21st century.

Spectral View Dermoscope
Spectral View Dermoscope

Dermatology enters the era of digital transformation. Digital Dermoscopy plays today a key role in converting clinical impressions into a well-documented examination, facilitating objective follow up. However, they still rely on colour imaging patterns that are often nonspecific to pathologies.

Spectral View is so much more than just a Video Digital Dermoscope. It is the world’s first spectral Dermoscope allowing for subsurface visualization and enabling the identification of skin lesions on the basis of their spectral pattern. It probes, in vivo, biochemical and microstructural alterations in skin lesions that are associated with the progress of disease.

Spectral View takes full advantage of spectroscopy to enhance the diagnostic confidence and to objectify clinical assessments. It can help to predict the risk of precancerous lesions to progress and assists melanoma detection at an early stage, minimising the risk of metastasis.

Besides melanocytic lesions, Spectral View addresses a wide array of skin pathologies and measures a series of skin quality parameters, essential for guiding aesthetic interventions.

Dermatology enters the era of digital transformation. Digital Dermoscopy plays today a key role in converting clinical impressions into a well-documented examination, facilitating objective follow up. However, they still rely on colour imaging patterns that are often nonspecific to pathologies.

Spectral View is so much more than just a Video Digital Dermoscope. It is the world’s first spectral Dermoscope allowing for subsurface visualization and enabling the identification of skin lesions on the basis of their spectral pattern. It probes, in vivo, biochemical and microstructural alterations in skin lesions that are associated with the progress of disease.

Spectral View takes full advantage of spectroscopy to enhance the diagnostic confidence and to objectify clinical assessments. It can help to predict the risk of precancerous lesions to progress and assists melanoma detection at an early stage, minimising the risk of metastasis.

Besides melanocytic lesions, Spectral View addresses a wide array of skin pathologies and measures a series of skin quality parameters, essential for guiding aesthetic interventions.

The Spectral View Dermoscope integrates and improves almost all visual examination and digital imaging tools used in dermatology practice. It is an excellent photography camera, an advanced digital microscope, a video rate spectral camera and a fluorescence digital imager. It also offers a series of advanced imaging modes, such as infrared and spectral imaging that assist dermatologists to detect pathologic conditions early, even at their subclinical stage. The advanced imaging modes offer a new insight to pathologies, highlighting the value of Spectral View as an indispensable diagnostic and research tool.

The Spectral View dermoscope integrates and overall advances almost all visual examination and digital imaging tools used in dermatology practice. It is an excellent photography camera, an advanced digital microscope, a video rate spectral camera and a Woods fluorescence digital imager. It also offers a series of advanced imaging modes, such as infrared and spectral imaging  that assist dermatologists to detect pathologic conditions early, even at their subclinical stage. The advanced imaging modes offer a new insight to pathologies, highlighting the value of Spectral View as an indispensable diagnostic and research tool.

Advance your dermatology practice with the power of Spectral Vision.
Clinical Value and Utility
Clinical Value and Utility

Spectral View is an advanced digital Dermoscope offering access to invisible features of diagnostic importance and addresses a wide array of skin conditions with a variety of unique features. Spectral View enhances and objectifies clinical assessments with a simple, fast, safe and non-invasive examination, minimizing the need for biopsy.

The Spectral View dermoscope package is a turnkey configuration comprising: A hand-held color/spectral camera, coupled with a “dome”, glare-free LED illuminator and a touch screen integrated computer. Both the camera and the computer system are mounted on a trolley, in an elegant and ergonomic design offering ease of use in the examination room and easy portability within the clinic. Please take a few moments to review the 10 points that make the difference with the color photography-based Dermoscopes.

Spectral View is an advanced digital Dermoscope offering access to invisible features of diagnostic importance and addresses a wide array of skin conditions with a variety of unique features. Spectral View enhances and objectifies clinical assessments with a simple, fast, safe and non-invasive examination, minimizing the need for biopsy.

The Spectral View dermoscope package is a turnkey configuration comprising: A hand-held color/spectral camera, coupled with a “dome”, glare-free LED illuminator and a touch screen integrated computer. Both the camera and the computer system are mounted on a trolley, in an elegant and ergonomic design offering ease of use in the examination room and easy portability within the clinic. Please take a few moments to review the 10 points that make the difference with the color photography-based Dermoscopes.

  1. Imaging spectrometry and spectral mapping: Spectral View is based on patented technologies that exploit the power of spectroscopy in probing the underlying biochemical/structural alterations, often associated with the progress of disease. Spectral View innovations allowed spectral mapping to become available in real time to the benefit of the clinical workflow. This feature assists dermatologists to differentiate between melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers as well as between benign, dysplastic and melanoma lesions.
  2. High definition, variable magnification digital imaging: The heart of Spectral View is a 6-megapixel sensor system offering real-time, ultrahigh definition digital imaging and allowing for a wide zoom range in all the supported imaging modes. The high spatial resolution supports the display of live video on extra-large monitors for patient information and for educational purposes, without compromising image quality.
  3. Near infrared imaging: Imaging in this invisible portion of the spectrum makes the upper layers of the skin transparent. This new optical window allows lesions to be differentiated in terms of their subsurface pattern. Normal, dysplastic and cancerous lesions are readily differentiated in real time, to assist expert diagnosis.
  4. Ultraviolet imaging: This is another invisible band of the spectrum, lying on the other end of the visible optical spectrum. It is a useful imaging mode for assessing subclinical sun damage and related susceptibility to melanoma.
  5. Fluorescence Imaging: Quantitative fluorescence imaging offers a unique tool for assisting the in vivo detection of fungal infections, the differentiation between non melanoma cancers, for the non-contact quantitative analysis of sebum excretion, for documenting acne and hormone disorders and for monitoring their response to therapy. Sebutapes and Wood’s lamps are no longer needed.
  6. Narrow-band Imaging: All spectral images can be displayed side-by-side with the color image, simultaneously and in real-time. Spectral imaging enhances the contrast and hence the visualization of features of diagnostic importance, by exploiting their spectral signatures. Imaging of invisible vascular patterns is useful on many occasions. It may also assist dermatologist’s and rheumatologists’ daily practice for assessing Raynaud’s phenomenon and systemic sclerosis conditions.
  7. Skin chromophore mapping and ABCDE measurement: Calibrated spectral mapping allows for the quantitative assessment of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin, and melanin concentration in every image pixel. It is a useful feature for evaluating blood perfusion for objectively assessing and monitoring diabetic and other ulcers. It is also useful for measuring skin pigmentation, skin typing and the ABCDE morphometric parameters in melanocytic lesions.
  8. Imaging colorimetry: It offers quantitative means for assessing skin color patterns and changes in a variety of conditions, such as erythema and irritation present in dermatitis, allergic reactions, photosensitivity etc.
  9. Skin surface topography: The specially designed “dome” illumination eliminates the glare effects on images and offers a unique means for visualizing and quantifying skin smoothness. Integrated software modules provide indices quantifying wrinkles, pores and hair density.
  10. Full body photography combined with spot multispectral imaging are stored together and are securely retrieved at any time and from any place with the aid of a navigation software for easy data review and reporting. Useful for detecting and long-term monitoring of suspicious skin changes.
  1. Imaging spectrometry and spectral mapping: Spectral View is based on patented technologies that exploit the power of spectroscopy in probing the underlying biochemical/structural alterations, often associated with the progress of disease. Spectral View innovations allowed spectral mapping to become available in real time to the benefit of the clinical workflow. This feature assists dermatologists to differentiate between melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers as well as between benign, dysplastic and melanoma lesions.
  2. High definition, variable magnification digital imaging: The heart of Spectral View is a 6-megapixel sensor system offering real-time, ultrahigh definition digital imaging and allowing for a wide zoom range in all the supported imaging modes. The high spatial resolution supports the display of live video on extra-large monitors for patient information and for educational purposes, without compromising image quality.
  3. Near infrared imaging: Imaging in this invisible portion of the spectrum makes the upper layers of the skin transparent. This new optical window allows lesions to be differentiated in terms of their subsurface pattern. Normal, dysplastic and cancerous lesions are readily differentiated in real time, to assist expert diagnosis.
  4. Ultraviolet imaging: This is another invisible band of the spectrum, lying on the other end of the visible optical spectrum. It is a useful imaging mode for assessing subclinical sun damage and related susceptibility to melanoma.
  5. Fluorescence Imaging: Quantitative fluorescence imaging offers a unique tool for assisting the in vivo detection of fungal infections, the differentiation between non melanoma cancers, for the non-contact quantitative analysis of sebum excretion, for documenting acne and hormone disorders and for monitoring their response to therapy. Sebutapes and Wood’s lamps are no longer needed.
  6. Narrow-band Imaging: All spectral images can be displayed side-by-side with the color image, simultaneously and in real-time. Spectral imaging enhances the contrast and hence the visualization of features of diagnostic importance, by exploiting their spectral signatures. Imaging of invisible vascular patterns is useful on many occasions. It may also assist dermatologist’s and rheumatologists’ daily practice for assessing Raynaud’s phenomenon and systemic sclerosis conditions.
  7. Skin chromophore mapping and ABCDE measurement: Calibrated spectral mapping allows for the quantitative assessment of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin, and melanin concentration in every image pixel. It is a useful feature for evaluating blood perfusion for objectively assessing and monitoring diabetic and other ulcers. It is also useful for measuring skin pigmentation, skin typing and the ABCDE morphometric parameters in melanocytic lesions.
  8. Imaging colorimetry: It offers quantitative means for assessing skin color patterns and changes in a variety of conditions, such as erythema and irritation present in dermatitis, allergic reactions, photosensitivity etc.
  9. Skin surface topography: The specially designed “dome” illumination eliminates the glare effects on images and offers a unique means for visualizing and quantifying skin smoothness. Integrated software modules provide indices quantifying wrinkles, pores and hair density.
  10. Full body photography combined with spot multispectral imaging are stored together and are securely retrieved at any time and from any place with the aid of a navigation software for easy data review and reporting. Useful for detecting and long-term monitoring of suspicious skin changes.

Color Images (left) of normal (bottom), dysplastic and melanoma moles (upper). Their macroscopic appearance is not informative for the underlining pathology. On the contrary, the spectral class color-coding of Spectral View mapping is clearly pathology-specific: white for the melanoma and red for the dysplastic mole

Spectral signatures and spectral mapping of a melanoma lesion and of normal skin in the visible and the near infrared spectra. Spectral assay aids and objectifies clinical assessments.

All critical information you need in one page generated instantly. Enhancing diagnostic confidence with combined spectral mapping and ABCDE analysis

All skin quality parameters in one page generated instantly. A unique tool for guiding and following up medical and aesthetic treatments

Digital fluorescence imaging replacing traditional Woods lamp examinations. Yellow and coral red fluorophores light up informing about sebum excretion and about microorganisms responsible for skin infections

Ultraviolet imaging informing about early signs for skin photodamage and guiding preventing treatments

Spectral View Technology
Spectral View Technology

Why Spectral Imaging?

Spectral imaging emerges as the successor to color imaging in numerous applications, including medicine. It merges imaging with spectroscopy, incorporating and improving all the features of conventional color cameras while adding spectral information, a powerful feature useful for probing invisible tissue microstructure and biochemistry.

Tissue components have characteristic spectral signatures that can be probed in vivo, in a non-invasive manner. The relative concentration of these components changes with the progress of several pathologies. Due to this fact, they comprise trustworthy biomarkers for the identification, grading and monitoring of skin lesions. For example, NADH expression changes in epithelial cancers, the oxy-, deoxy-hemoglobin ratio changes in conditions affecting blood perfusion (e.g. diabetic limb) and the eumelanin-pheomelanin ratio changes when a melanocytic lesion progresses to melanoma.

Why Spectral Imaging?

Spectral imaging emerges as the successor to color imaging in numerous applications, including medicine. It merges imaging with spectroscopy, incorporating and improving all the features of conventional color cameras while adding spectral information, a powerful feature useful for probing invisible tissue microstructure and biochemistry.

Tissue components have characteristic spectral signatures that can be probed in vivo, in a non-invasive manner. The relative concentration of these components changes with the progress of several pathologies. Due to this fact, they comprise trustworthy biomarkers for the identification, grading and monitoring of skin lesions. For example, NADH expression changes in epithelial cancers, the oxy-, deoxy-hemoglobin ratio changes in conditions affecting blood perfusion (e.g. diabetic limb) and the eumelanin-pheomelanin ratio changes when a melanocytic lesion progresses to melanoma.

The spectral signatures of tissue components are utilized as biomarkers for skin optical biopsy

The Spectral View Dermoscope uses the power of spectral imaging to reveal invisible biochemical and micro-structural changes and to establish the spectral signatures and patterns of skin pathologies

Another essential aspect of skin diagnosis is the depth information. The staging of melanoma, for example, is based on the Clark’s levels correlating infiltration depth and stage/prognosis. Depth-critical information is provided today only through biopsy/histology because conventional digital Dermoscopes images contain information only for the upper 1 mm layers of skin. In melanocytic lesions this depth is even shorter because visible radiation in heavily absorbed in this spectral band.

Another essential aspect of skin diagnosis is the depth information. The staging of melanoma, for example, is based on the Clark’s levels correlating infiltration depth and stage/prognosis. Depth-critical information is provided today only through biopsy/histology because conventional digital Dermoscopes images contain information only for the upper 1 mm layers of skin. In melanocytic lesions this depth is even shorter because visible radiation in heavily absorbed in this spectral band.

Near Infrared radiation penetrates deeper skin layers, and probes essential, hidden diagnostic information

The Spectral View Dermoscope provides Near-Infrared imaging that makes the upper layer of the skin transparent. This comprises an optical window that allows for the in-depth live inspection of subsurface structures. The subsurface pattern of melanocytic lesions is very informative for their identification and differentiation.

Why QCELL’s Spectral View Dermoscope 

Originally developed for space applications, hyperspectral imaging has demonstrated great potential for improving the accuracy of in vivo diagnosis in several medical disciplines, including melanoma diagnosis. However, conventional hyperspectral cameras are very expensive and require stable conditions during their long scanning time. These shortcomings are largely prohibitive for their routine clinical use requiring live inspections and examination of large areas in screening/monitoring consultations.

QCELL has invented and patented an imaging technology that eliminate these barriers to entry and makes the unique features of spectral imaging easily accessible to routine clinical use. QCELL’s novel imaging sensor design enables high definition video rate spectral imaging in a low cost, handheld device.

The Spectral View Dermoscope leaps far ahead of the competition. It offers real-time comparative inspection of skin lesions in a variety of imaging modes including Ultraviolet, Visible, Infrared imaging and Spectral Mapping channels, displayed on a high definition touch screen. Spectral View enriches clinical assessment options by offering visualization of an ultra-high definition colour image together with images depicting subsurface structures and biochemical information of diagnostic importance. In addition, live Spectral Mapping reveal invisible biochemical and micro-structural alterations in skin pathologies, improving the in vivo diagnostic accuracy.

The quality, volume and reliability of the diagnostic information that can be gathered in Dermoscopy is greatly affected by the choice of illumination system. Dermoscopy practitioners use a variety of techniques, such as the non-polarized light contact Dermoscopy (NPD), polarized light contact Dermoscopy (PCD) and polarized light non-contact Dermoscopy (PNCD). Clinical studies have shown that there are pros and cons associated with their clinical use, with none of them offering clear superiority.

Spectral View integrates an innovative skin illumination arrangement called “Dome Illumination”. The Dome illuminator sheds perfectly diffused light onto the skin surface, with light rays coming from all points of a dome’s hemisphere. This innovative, patent pending, illumination system aggregates all the positive features of the aforementioned illumination systems, while removing their respective disadvantages. It eliminates glare, while, at the same time, enhancing both surface and subsurface information. QCELL’s dome structure also offers many advantages for enabling skin topography imaging and ambient light-independent fluorescence imaging.

The quality, volume and reliability of the diagnostic information that can be gathered in Dermoscopy is greatly affected by the choice of illumination system. Dermoscopy practitioners use a variety of techniques, such as the non-polarized light contact Dermoscopy (NPD), polarized light contact Dermoscopy (PCD) and polarized light non-contact Dermoscopy (PNCD). Clinical studies have shown that there are pros and cons associated with their clinical use, with none of them offering clear superiority.

Spectral View integrates an innovative skin illumination arrangement called “Dome Illumination”. The Dome illuminator sheds perfectly diffused light onto the skin surface, with light rays coming from all points of a dome’s hemisphere. This innovative, patent pending, illumination system aggregates all the positive features of the aforementioned illumination systems, while removing their respective disadvantages. It eliminates glare, while, at the same time, enhancing both surface and subsurface information. QCELL’s dome structure also offers many advantages for enabling skin topography imaging and ambient light-independent fluorescence imaging.

C. Benvenuto-Andrade, et al, “Differences Between Polarized Light Dermoscopy and Immersion Contact Dermoscopy for the Evaluation of Skin Lesions”